Students celebrating the 'International Day' in the building of the Study Program Division Forest Science and Resource Management (Photo: U. Benz/TUM)
Students celebrating the 'International Day' in the building of the Study Program Division Forest Science and Resource Management (Photo: U. Benz/TUM)

About us

In its courses, the Study Program Division Forest Science and Resource Management mainly focuses on sustainable thinking. Nowadays many companies and organizations use the term 'sustainability' in their advertising and company strategies and claim to be working sustainably. In these times of a more globalized world, it is more important than ever to strengthen awareness of sustainable thinking. The aim of the Study Program Division Forest Science and Resource Management is to inform as many people as possible about sustainability and to promote its support in society.

The birth of sustainability clearly is to be found in forestry. Almost 300 years ago, Hans Carl von Carlowitz, a Saxon forester, was the first to describe the principle of sustainability. In his book silvicultura oeconomica, written in 1713, he describes how a mine can be sustainably supplied with mine timber. Thus, sustainable thinking and sustainable economic activities were established in German forestry centuries ago.

The world's first forestry office was opened in Bad Reichenhall (Southern Germany, District of Bavaria). Secure long-term supply of timber for the seething of salt (which is also called the 'white gold') was paramount for the seething masters in Bad Reichenhall as timber is of paramount importance in the process. Therefore, utmost attention was paid to the fact that timber should not be overused, as it was one of the most important combustibles and building materials at that time. The sustainable use of other resources only became important later on.

The Study Program Division Forest Science and Resource Management aims to teach a modern principle of sustainability to its students while remaining based on the old tradition. The modern principle of sustainability also includes the sectors of ecology, socio-economics and manufacturing.